Melinda Trucks (Sept. 12 – Nov. 21, 2015)

Melinda Trucks, A Man of Letters

Melinda Trucks, A Man of Letters

(East Gallery) Melinda Trucks learns through seeing. Her painting is an attempt to sort through and make sense of her perceptions in her primary language: color and contrast. Therefore, Melinda’s artwork is an intensely personal effort to understand the world. It presents itself to her in an array of light and shadow. Highly saturated, intense colors attract her, but she find that as she develops as an artist, she turn towards the subtle, the neutral. She sees in shapes of color. These are the basic units of her compositions that she molds into the illusion of space and mass. Melinda is not afraid to be painterly and representational in her work. To her, painting is an illusion. At its best, it reflects the illusory nature of the perceived world of human experience.

“Melinda Trucks’ impressive exhibition at the Coral Springs Museum of Art is an exciting documentary of the artist’s creative efforts in many different disciplines, including portraiture. As the curator for this memorable show, it’s been a privileged and revealing experience to work with Ms. Trucks on this project for the last two years. During the selection process from her robust studio inventory, I had the rare opportunity to become familiar with a variety of works in the many categories that she has fashioned while painting over the last twenty years.

Melinda Trucks, Through the Arch Mounts Botanical Garden

Melinda Trucks, Through the Arch Mounts Botanical Garden

Melinda Trucks systematically has maintained a disciplined approach to art-making since attending the University of Tennessee’s College of Fine Arts, and later as she pursued a master’s degree in painting at the School of Visual Arts at Florida State University, as well as advanced courses at the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach. She has been painting regularly ever since, and maintains studios in West Palm Beach and in Sauve, France,in a restored 14th century farmhouse, likely the perfect setting for producing landscapes and traditional still-lifes.”
Guest Curator Bruce Helander

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