Pablo D. Cano – Marionettes to Cake Boxes (May 31 – Aug. 23, 2014)

(Main Gallery) Pablo D. Cano’s “Marionettes to Cake Boxes” (mixed media sculpture and drawing) will be on exhibition throughout the summer. Born in Havana, Cuba in 1961, Pablo Cano was on the last flight out of the country before the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. He has since been a resident of Miami’s Little Havana, and is regarded by art patrons and critics alike as one of Florida’s premier contemporary fine artists.

Pablo D. Cano's Countess Ukulele Marionette (detail), 2007, ukulele, dolls eyes, air dry clay, paint, wood, cigarette paper foil, glue, red feather boa, tin & plastic, Private collection of Mr. Valentino Valls

Pablo D. Cano’s Countess Ukulele Marionette (detail), 2007, ukulele, dolls eyes, air dry clay, paint, wood, cigarette paper foil, glue, red feather boa, tin & plastic, Private collection of Mr. Valentino Valls

Since childhood, marionettes have fascinated Pablo. At the age of ten, he was mounting elaborate plays for his family featuring puppets constructed of household bric-a-brac. His primary work today continues to center around the marionettes that he fashions from found objects, and the performance pieces he composes to showcase these protagonists.

Cano reveals, “I create a dream world where inanimate objects come to life – springing from my imagination in the Surrealist tradition. But my work is founded on Dada ideals. The Dadaists used chance, spontaneity, and childlike innocence in order to create their statement. Their intention, as is mine, was to break with tradition and painting technique and to return to the elemental basics of art; to start from scratch; to allow the process of imagination to unfold and begin anew each time I create.”

Influences from the color palette of Russian Constructivist Alexandra Exter, who assembled marionettes in the 1920s, the mechanics of the pieces in Alexander Calder’s Circus and Cubist bricolage can be seen in Pablo’s work. By incorporating carefully selected discarded debris from the urban streets he frequents, as well as miscellany brought to his studio by friends from all over the world, Cano has ultimately developed his own charming and inventive palette that has been described as unlike any other artist’s today.

Dr. Yolanda Sanchez, noted Curator and Artist, comments, “the work has remarkable energy – a sensation of things about to break free. Not just because most of his pieces have the capacity for movement, but because the accretion of divergent parts and the unique way that Pablo fuses them create a tremendous build-up of energy – a whole new entity of reordered parts, bigger and stronger than the individual pieces.”

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